Healthy Decisions for the Love of Health

The Importance of Natural Mineral Sugars
By: Dr. A.F. (Sande) Beddoe

Understanding the value of mineral sugars in foods — based on the principles of Dr. Carey Reams applied to the farm and garden

The most important ingredient for the best physical wellbeing is wholesome clean food that contains the highest possible level of nutrients. But how can we know if we are consuming this type of food? First, the food must come from plants grown under conditions that will allow the least contact with toxic substances from air, water or soil. In other words, have the best natural or “organic” principles of clean growing been followed? Second, the food must come from plants that have been grown in such a way as to insure that the greatest amount of natural mineral sugars have accumulated in the plant’s cells.

With so much interest in the organic concepts of food production today, those interested in healthy foods incorrectly tend to think that “organically” grown food is the most nutritious food available. Don’t get me wrong, I’m definitely a believer in food grown in toxic free environments. However, established “organic” concepts of food production have very definite limitations when it comes to producing nutrient dense and rich foods. It is one thing to grow a clean food, but it is definitely another matter to grow food that is clean and also has the greatest amount of mineral nutrient possible.

So, in order for the reader to gain insight into what makes the highest nutritive food from plants, it will be very important to understand a very basic law of plant chemistry. That law is: The higher the organic mineral and natural oil content, the higher the natural sugar content. What I am saying is that if you want to be aware of the nutrition levels of a plant or its fruit grown for food—measure the natural sugar content of that plant and/or its fruit. When you know the natural sugar levels you can become aware of how high the natural mineral sugars are in that vegetable orf fruit.

TOXIC ORGANICS
Nature makes nutrition by making sugar naturally. A plant food deficient of sugar, no matter how organically clean it has been grown, potentially becomes a toxic food. This is because “organically grown,” as well as standard “commercially grown” food that are low in natural sugars contribute to indigestion.

The naturally formed sugars all produce food that is high in heat energy—usually measured as calories—and there is more to that energy than most imagine. Sugar energy is vitally involved in the natural digestive processes, because it is the most important substance for supplying the heat energy that many digestive enzymes need to function properly. Yes, sugar supplies heat through a natural fermentation process that manufactures small amounts of alcohol required to ideally regulate our body’s core temperature. Without the proper heat from mineral rich natural sugars, natural body alcohols will be deficient impairing the heat activated digestive enzymes, produced by the liver, resulting in indigestion. Dr. Reams found that in order for a food to begin to be properly digested, it must contain a minimum of 12 per cent natural sugar.

Another aspect is that sugar cannot function properly in the digestion unless it contains its own full compliment of calcium /mineral factors that developed with it in the plant. As sugar is made in the plant’s natural chemical reactions—part of the photosynthesis process — calcium /mineral nutrients, including natural oils, are made at the same time. This is why, when plants end up with a poor or deficient sugar content, they are deficient in the corresponding minerals (especially calcium), oils and enzymes . This is also why a person eating mineral deficient food will, at some point, begin to desire extra sugar with their meal to satisfy the digestion’s mineral energy needs. Have you ever wondered why you crave sugar after some meals? Of course that added sugar, customarily being of the wrong type, will only add to the problem of mineral deficiency because the body then has to depend on releasing its stored mineral to allow that refined sugar to be processed properly. Thus, were one to eat mineral sugar deficient foods they would be eating foods that are potentially electro-chemically toxic no matter how chemically free they are grown. When foods do not digest into usable substances for the body, the body will treat them as any potentially “toxic” substance and try to get rid of them. Here is the reason for most food “allergies.” They are really toxic conditions resulting from indigestion caused by mineral-sugar deficient food. So the ultimate answer to food allergies isn’t to quit eating the food, but rather to improve the digestion by improving the food put into it. A vital part of this solution comes though consuming high nutrient, or more nourishing rich foods, measured by the natural mineral sugar content. Remember, organically grown food becomes a toxic food if it is only grown chemically-free, without paying attention to growing superior mineral-sugar content into it at the same time.

 

BRIX CHART FOR DETERMINING QUALITY PRODUCE

Plant:

 

Poor
Avg
Good
Excel
Alfalfa
4
8
16
22
Apples
6
10
14
18
Asparagus
2
4
6
8
Avocados
4
6
8
10
Bananas
8
10
12
14
Beets
6
8
10
12
Bell Peppers
4
6
8
12
Blueberries
6
8
12
14
Broccoli
6
8
10
12
Cabbage
6
8
10
12
Carrots
4
6
12
18
Cantaloupe
8
12
14
16
Casaba
8
10
12
14
Cauliflower
4
6
8
10
Celery
4
6
10
12
Cherries
6
8
14
16
Coconut
8
10
12
14
Corn Stalks
4
8
14
20
Corn, young
6
10
18
24
Cow Peas
4
6
10
12
Kumquat
4
6
8
10
Endive
4
6
8
10
English Peas
8
10
12
14
Escarole
4
6
8
10
Field Peas
8
10
12
14
Grains
6
10
14
18
Grapes
8
12
16
20
Grapefruit
6
10
14
18
Green Beans
4
6
8
10
Honeydew
8
10
12
14
Hot Peppers
4
6
8
10
Kohlrabi
6
8
10
12
Lemons
4
6
8
12
Lettuce
4
6
8
10
Limes
4
6
8
12
Mangos
4
6
10
14
Onions
4
6
8
10
Oranges
6
10
16
20
Papayas
6
10
18
22
Parsley
4
6
8
10
Peaches
6
10
14
18
Peanuts
4
6
8
10
Pears
6
10
12
14
Pineapple
12
14
20
22
Raisins
60
70
75
80
Raspberries
6
8
12
14
Rutabagas
4
6
10
12
Sorghum
6
10
22
30
Squash
6
8
12
14
Strawberries
6
10
14
16
Sweet Corn
6
10
18
24
Sweet Potato
6
8
10
14
Tomatoes
4
6
8
12
Turnips
4
6
8
10
Watermelon
8
12
14
16

MEASURE THE SUGAR YOURSELF
Since the measure of the nutritional quality of fresh produce is the sugar content, obviously then the better the nutrition in the produce the sweeter it will taste. The human sense of taste was designed to lead one to good food. However, humans do not have the sensitive taste for mineral sugar that a cow and many animals like them have. A cow can distinguish as small as one-half of one percent difference in sugar content between two of its available foods. This is why the animals are so often seen stretching over fences looking for greener—sweeter—pastures.

Just as the cow uses sugar content to tell how good the food is, you can learn to distinguish the natural sugar content of different types of fresh produce. But, you must get personally involved if you want to learn how to distinguish high quality nourishing foods. Besides relying on your taste, the most accurate way to measure the amount of natural mineral sugars is to acquire a device called a hand held refractometer. It is a pocket sized instrument which can be purchased for between $75 and $200—unless you can borrow one from a friend. If you are interested in purchasing quality produce and want to know if you are getting your monies worth, this little instrument will give you a distinct advantage. Remember, you will be getting more for your money if you purchase a box of apples for $20, if the sugar content of the apples is 18 percent (18 Brix on a refractometer), rather than 10 percent. Sugar in the fruit juice is a dissolved solid. Therefore, it adds weight to the produce the more there is of it in the fruit juice. So a box of apples containing 18 percent sugar fruit, rather than 10 percent sugar fruit, will also weigh more. The refractometer does not lie and it will pay for itself with the information it supplies.

The accompanying chart shows the Brix levels for determining if the produce is poor, average, good and of excellent quality.

THE BEST VITAMIN AND MINERAL SUPPLEMENT
The best way for an individual to get his vitamins and minerals is from food. No, I’m not against the use of vitamins and mineral supplements, in fact, without properly grown food it may be the only source, but by far the best way to get them is from the food grown in the best of controlled conditions producing clean optimum sugar content foods. This is accomplished the quickest by getting involved with growing a home garden. You don’t have to wait for someone to do it. Instead you can begin by accomplishing this for yourself. It is my belief that the home gardener and farmer, growing high quality food, can have more effect on the health of the community or nation than all the medical institutions put together — a vital premise of Dr. Carey Reams, whom I studied with between 1975 and his death in 1985.

AMBASSADOR OF SWEET INFORMATION
Not only will you begin to make a difference in the health of your family, but you will also make a difference in the health of your community. What produce manager, who truly sees his job as a service to the community, would not be interested in knowing how to measure and demand sweeter and better produce. Just see what happens when you use a refractometer in a super market, farmers market or produce stand! It does get peoples attention. And more than that, it gives you the ability to share the knowledge about what top quality produce really means. So go ahead and really feed your “sweet tooth” properly. Natural mineral sugars from the plant—not manufactured sugars—are absolutely vital to life—know where and how to get them.

Submitted by
Dr. Alexander F. Beddoe, D.D.S.

Yacon Syrup

Sweetness has never been so healthy! Imagine a natural raw & agro chemical-free low-calorie sweet treat which is positively good for you. Nature's healthy sweetener - Yacon Syrup!

Tastes like molasses!

Fresh pressed from the yacon root, this gift from nature has been enjoyed for centuries in the Andean highlands of Peru.

As a prebiotic, yacon is good for digestion, stimulates positive colon health, and helps absorption of calcium and vitamins.

Though packed with sweetness, the sugar in yacon is mainly fructooligosaccharide, which cannot be absorbed by the body.

This means yacon is both naturally low-calorie and low in mono and disaccharides (less than 1 g per serving), sugars that rapidly elevate blood sugar levels. Use it as you would honey or maple syrup on foods and in recipes or sweeten beverages with a spoonful.

Yacon is a distant relative of the sunflower with edible tubers and leaves. It is commonly grown and consumed from Colombia to northwest Argentina. Locally, the tuber is often chopped and added to salads, and are also consumed boiled or baked. Yacon roots contain important quantities of potassium and antioxidants.

The root of yacon is considered the world's richest natural source of FOS (Fructooliosaccharides). Most other roots and tubers store carbohydrates as starch - a polymer of glucose; yacon stores carbohydrate as FOS - a polymer composed mainly of fructose. This FOS can be considered a subgroup of inulin because they have a similar molecular structure, but with shorter fructose chains.

Yacon syrup regulates intestinal flora, reduces constipation, helps to reduce the risk of developing colon cancer, improves calcium absorption, helps reduce cholesterol and triglycerides, boosts the immunological system, and is ideal for low-calorie diets.

Yacon syrup can contains approximately 30% FOS and low proportions of simple sugars (e.g., glucose, fructose and sucrose). The human body has no enzyme to hydrolyze FOS, so it passes through the digestive tract unmetabolized, providing few calories, a marketing strength for dieters and diabetics. Yacon also acts as a prebiotic. The undigested portion of yacon serves as food for "friendly" bacteria, such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus species, in the colon. Clinical studies have shown that administering FOS can increase the number of these friendly bacteria in the colon while simultaneously reducing the population of harmful bacteria.

Other benefits noted with FOS supplementation include increased production of beneficial short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate, increased absorption of calcium and magnesium, and improved elimination of toxic compounds. Preclinical studies indicate an increase in bone density after consumption of FOS. In addition, the beneficial effects of FOS on the presence of Bifidobacteria suggest an improved absorption of vitamins, such as the B complexes.

Copyright © 2005 HealthSmart Nutrition. All rights reserved.
Revised: September 30, 2006

 

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